Two months in Japan and I managed to get to a hospital

I was running down the stairs, looking forward to eating the marshmallows that I wanted to buy. While running down I even told myself that once I end up with sprained ankle. I did all five floors and I slipped on the very last stair, fell down and while falling I heard a cracking noise in my ankle.

First I just lied there and tried to breath off the pain. I even managed to buy the marshmallows after. Back at the office I put the leg on the table and I worked as if nothing happened. When I wanted to go home though, I only did few meters on the hall outside of my office and then I felt very week with cold sweat dripping down my forehead and I had to sit down.

My sensei found me there. Together with the secretaries they called to a nearby hospital to ask if they still could accept me there, they put an ice on my ankle, called a taxi for which they gave me some kind of coupon to pay it with and a colleague and my tutor Oishi-san went with me. There they roentgened it, it wasn't broken, just a little sprained. They secured the ankle with a splint and lent me some old crutches. It all cost around 100 euro, but since I had the insurance I payed 30 percent of the amount.

They asked me to come the next day again, although I didn't know why. Rather than going home and trying to get back the next day I decided to stay at the office over night. The colleagues do that when they have some work to do and don't want to lose time by going home and back. I used to do that too in Portugal. I have a comfortable chair. After we returned back to the institute, Oishi-san informed about it the rest of the group and sensei offered the couch from her office, colleagues moved it to my space and even put sheets on it. Do I have the best colleagues in the world or what?


Comments:

looking:
nurse "looking" here.

shall i come be nursemaid?

Chris:
HEHEHE "Nurse Looking"... I think you need to check on your patient. Looks like he could use more food! Hope you learned your lesson Milan! Be Quick but Never Hurry!

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